Fighting Hunger Incentive Act aims to solve food waste

A few times a week, I have the privilege of dining at La Salle’s finest: Blue & Gold (B&G). Like most do at a buffet-style restaurant, I fill my plate with various foods that I would enjoy trying. If I don’t like something on my plate, I push it aside and eat something else. After my meal, all of the left-over food on my plate is placed on the conveyor belt and sent to be thrown away, and this action contributes to one of the world’s biggest problems: food waste

About 20 pounds of food per person is wasted monthly.

About 20 pounds of food per person is wasted monthly.

An astounding 1.3 billion metric tons of food is wasted worldwide, causing food waste to be one of the biggest environmental and social problems yet. Among the 1.3 billion tons, about 40 percent of food in the United States is wasted and thrown into landfills. That’s almost half. Half of the food that Americans handle is either rotten or thrown into a garbage can without thought. What can be done to fix this problem, you ask? The answer is the Fighting Hunger Incentive Act.

This act aims to encourage supermarkets, restaurants, and farms to donate their excess food. This sounds appealing to hungry Americans, however the Obama Administration is threatening to veto it. A major reason for the threat is due to money loss. It is estimated that the tax code rewrite will reduce government revenue by $2.2 billion. This act will benefit food banks, but it will not benefit tax payers.

About 40 percent of food in the United States is thrown away.

About 40 percent of food in the United States is thrown away.

In a typically month in the United States, more than 20 pounds of food per person goes uneaten. That is the equivalent of throwing away $165 billion per year. Not only is money being wasted, people are also starving. Hunger is a serious global issue that currently has no solution. We must work together as a nation to pass the Fighting Hunger Incentive Act in order to stop food waste and help the hungry.

Words: 329

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